Posts Tagged ‘Branding’

The Loyalty Factor To A Brand.

What exactly is a brand? It’s a question that has confounded the academics for decades and eluded the most erudite of scholars. So, coming from the trenches of the real world of branding, we’ve defined the term and given it a comprehensive meaning..

A brand consists of eight basic building blocks:

– The Name – The Logo (brand icon) – The Brand’s Colors – The Slogan and Brand Messaging – The Sound of the Brand – The Overall Look and Feel = The Brand’s Position – Packaging the Brand – The Brand Experience

A Brand is the greater sum of its parts. It is always more than just the nuts and bolts, the pieces; great brands are always the result of the whole equaling more than the sum of its parts.

Branding is about making me, the consumer or buyer, more hip, more in the “know,” more cool than anybody else. We are a generation and a nation wanting to be special. We want to be richer, more beautiful, better dressed and more effortlessly gorgeous than any other generation that we know.

The Loyalty Factor

Coca Cola is the king of branding and loyalty.

We want everything to mean more. We want everything to have meaning. That’s why we flock to the reality shows. Why we love “Survivor” and “The Voice” and other top reality shows. We also look to YouTube, Vimeo and other video platforms for content that we desire. We crave authenticity in this age of fabrication and falsehood. We “just want to be real.”

We want to be able to trust what we buy and whom we buy from. That’s why Coke is still the number one brand in the world. The more we know about a brand, the more we trust it. The more we trust it, the more we buy it and continue to experience it. The more we experience it, the more loyal we become.

Loyalty is the currency that cannot be traded for dollars.

3 Key Ingredients In Branding

Personal Branding can be the most influential tool for success in your self-marketing toolkit. You can identify, package and sell who you are to build a personal brand that results in business growth, influence, and income.

Here are three key things you need to develop a strong personal brand:

1. Get clear on your personal strengths, talents, values, and core area of expertise. Understand how you connect best with people. Consider what your target audience needs and wants, and then identify the value and the experience that you can deliver to meet those needs and wants. Communicate in ways that reach into the hearts and minds of your target audience and connect with their core values and deepest desires.

2. The personal branding process is about having self-awareness of your strengths and talents, and then letting everyone know about your gifts, talents, and experience. It’s about giving a clear impression of who you are, what you value, what you’re committed to, and how you can be counted upon to act. Your branding statement must provide a clear, concise view of your unique set of strengths and tell why you can do it better than anyone else. You need to be able to state clearly and unequivocally why you are different than everyone else, and what services you offer that make you unique and set you ahead of your competition.

3.Consistency is one of the keys to building a strong personal brand. Be aware of being consistent in every interaction you have, both in what you say and how you respond. Establishing a Professional Brand is absolutely critical to long term, sustainable business growth. In an overcrowded marketplace, if you’re not standing out, then you’re invisible. Branding your products and services will give you an edge over your competition and enhance your value to your target market

Make Your First Impression The Best Impression

The first 10 to 20 seconds are crucial in creating the best fist impression in your first meeting. People observe you from head to toe. They study your physical personality, demeanor, mannerisms, body language, your style or fashion, etc. It is therefore vital for you to make the best impression. Because once the impression is made, it is mostly irreversible. If you have made a good one, it is good; but if you have not, the damage is done. You may interest some and disappoint others. Most of us wish to make the best impression in others whether the meeting is personal or professional.

How do people assess you the first time they see you?

You are always appraised in initial business and social environments. When they see you for the first time, people notice your dress, your shoes, handbag and hairstyle, your body language, your mannerisms, etc. Certain elements contribute to making your first impression. They are: Physical appearance, body language, verbal communication and how well you perceive other people. Here are a few tips from Colorado Tech to make the best first impressions.

  1. Be authentic. Think about it: there’s no bigger turnoff than when someone is perceived as faking an interest in you. Don’t do it to other people. Show real interest, and they’ll show it back. All the other suggestions here come back to this: If you genuinely care about someone or are genuinely interested in them, that will show in your interactions with them.
  2. Ask open-ended questions. Avoid questions that can be answered “yes” or “no.” You want to start a conversation. The best way to do so is to ask questions that are open-ended and require longer answers. Do you understand? Yes. Oops.
  3. Maintain eye contact and smile. If you’re looking over the shoulder of the person you’re talking to in hopes of finding someone more “important,” or otherwise looking bored and not making eye contact, then you’re sending a clear signal that you’re not interested. The person you’re talking to is likely to show you the same (dis)courtesy.
  4. Listen. This seems obvious enough, but if you’re in the midst of a group, or thinking about other things it might be hard to really take in what someone is telling you. But it’ll be obvious if you’re not paying attention, so focus in. Make the person you’re talking to feel important and relevant.
  5. Follow through. Even if you’re networking because you’re on the lookout for a new opportunity doesn’t mean you shouldn’t help others in the same position. Did you meet someone who might be a good fit for a job opening in your company? Did you tell someone you would follow up with that name of an electrician? Make sure you follow through to make a good impression.
  6. Do things you enjoy. Networking isn’t just about meeting strangers in your industry. You can network anywhere, at any time. If you are uncomfortable at traditional network events, branch out. Join professional organizations, or clubs where professionals meet to do activities together like volunteering, tennis playing, or dining. You will be surprised at the types of people you meet and the natural way in which you interact when “networking” isn’t the ultimate goal.
  7. Say thank you. If someone helps you or does something for you — no matter how small — write a thank you note. That small effort will make you a big standout.

Then the bad:

Don’t:

  1. Ask for a job.That kind of request puts a lot of pressure on the person you’re asking. Instead, make the person you’re talking to an ally in your job search by asking them for insight and advice. If you do this, then it might very well be you they think of when they have an open position.
  2. Hit and run. A hit-and-run networker is someone who connects, gets what they want, and then disappears, never to be heard from again. Or at least until the next time they need something. Instead, follow up, tell them thank you, and offer any reciprocal help you can.
  3. Avoid talking to the “little people.” Everyone is important. No one deserves to be ignored or treated poorly, no matter their job title. The most junior member of your department? She will remember the length of her career how you treated her. The secretary? He knows before anyone else when a position is about to open up. The guy who mops the floors? Learn his name. You never know when you will need someone’s helping hand, and you’ll be surprised at where that help comes from. (source)