Archive for the ‘Advertising’ Category

7 Ways To Show Authority In Writing Copy

One of the goals a writer has in copy writing is to convince the reader. Good, authoritative copy is very easy for readers to trust because it sounds more truthful and caters to their wants, needs and interests. As a result, response rates are better and there is a higher likelihood that the desired results are achieved. Integrating a tone of authority in writing a copy is a studied process but it is not entirely impossible. Here are the top 7 ways you can improve your copy and make it more influential and convincing:

Know your topic
Never write copy about a subject you have little or no knowledge about. If you want to prove you have authority in writing that copy, you should be able to show your audience or readers that you know exactly what you are writing about. Your readers can tell if you’re only bluffing.

Prove your experience
Another way to show you have authority in writing copy is by proving you have the correct experience about the subject. You can’t write about rocket science with authority if the closest you’ve ever come close to a rocket is by watching a fireworks display.

Use your USP

Every product, idea or statement has a USP or unique sales proposition. Find out what yours is when writing copy. The USP will help define your statement and make you stand out from write-ups that have a similar idea. You can use this to your advantage to create authority.Make the statement clear so your readers will understand immediately the message you are trying to put across.

State the benefits and advantages
There will always be disadvantages or limitations to your product, idea or statement. Instead of detailing them to your readers, focus on the advantages and benefits. Tell your readers what it can do and what it can’t do.

If you’re promoting a bicycle, for example, you don’t have to state that it’s not as fast as a car. It can’t fly but it can help its user reach his destination. It’s cheap, doesn’t pollute the environment and can even be an instrument of fitness.

Use facts
Embellishing your statements may sound harmless but the effect on your readers may not be advantageous to you. Consumers and readers are a bit sensitive and they will take it personally if they find that you were pulling the wool over their eyes. There is nothing that works as fast as an overstatement to decrease your credibility. If you want to have authority in writing copy, state only the facts – statements that are easily verifiable.

Back up your claims
Authority in writing copy is similar to writing news stories – you need proof of your statements. If you make one, make sure it’s backed up by details and figures that may be corroborated. If there is a study, research or statement made by an expert that will support your claim, use that as well. So in case someone asks, you can point them to the reference that will support what you said.

Don’t mess with the language
If you want to be trusted as an authority in writing a copy, make sure you take care to show good grammatical and spelling skills. Nothing destroys an authoritative position than bad language because it speaks of carelessness and a lack of knowledge. If you want to be seen and accepted as an expert, show respect for your readers and write well.

Marketing with benefit statements

As most business owners have found out along the way, having a top notch product or service is not enough to be successful. Among the many factors needed for success, being able to communicate your business to your target market is vital.

How can you communicate in a way that brings results? By using benefit language that describes the results they will get if they hire you.

The mistake most businesses make is to talk too much about the features of their product or service, and not nearly enough about the benefits to the client. If a prospect takes the time to read your brochure or look at your advertising, what he wants to know is “what’s in it for me?”

Features describe how your product works, or what you do. Benefits describe the result the customer will receive from using your product or service. For example, in-home consultation may be a feature of a carpeting retailer, which means you get the result of making selections from the comfort of your home without have to drive anywhere.

If you’re having difficulties describing your business’ benefits try this: Take a major feature of your product and describe what will be the customer experience as a result of that feature. Sum up that experience in a concise sentence or two, and you’ve just written your first benefit statement.

Take a look at your marketing materials. They should be loaded with benefit statements. When your prospects are able to clearly conceive the benefits they’ll get from buying your product or service, they’ll line up quickly to become customers

Impact Of Colors In Advertising

This article is about the Impact Of Colors In Advertising. Human brain receives signals faster through eyes rather than ears. Visual appearance is supposed to be more appealing when compared to any other senses, no matter what the medium of presentation is. So, there are methods by which one can increase the visual appeal. Other senses facilitate visual appeal, and are also important to concentrate on.

Typical example is color when accompanied with audio, and writing. According to a study, big budget companies spend billions in the color market research, which helps in product and packaging development. Color, along with content, helps to pertain the interest of the visitor and makes him surf the website longer. A colorful article will make the reader read it till the end. Color makes things look more amiable.

Colors are known to influence the behavior of a person. Like blue color is said to have a relaxing effect. Red represents passion and love. A dating website can have red as the background color. Fast food restaurants have bright picture of food beautifully decorated pasted on the walls. This tempts the taste buds of the customer and the customer pounces on the food, eats and leaves quickly. And this is exactly the reaction expected.

Light effects can also be used to play with the mind of the on-looker. Advertisements, especially for food products, have strategically placed lights. The light effects trigger the hormones in the brain, which increases the hunger. If the same is placed in a slightly dim light, it won’t be equally tempting.

Countries around the world have different cultures that relate a color to an occasion or emotion. Climatic conditions also attribute to this. Like in America, people relate black to death and where as in Asia, white is related to death. People living near the equator like warm colors and people living nearer to the poles like cold colors.

It’s a must for an advertiser to have the knowledge about the colors and what they refer too. Black stands for elegance, sophistication, seduction and mystery. White stands for peace, pure, clean, mild and youthful. Gold stands for prestige, luxury and elite. Silver stands for prestige, scientific and cold. Yellow stands for warmth, happiness and cheer. Orange stands for warmth, playfulness, and vibrant. Red stands for love, excitement, strength, passion, and danger. Pink stands for nurture, sweet, soft, and security. Green stands for nature, fresh, fertility and abundance. Blue stands for cool, trust, belonging and reliability. And lastly Purple stands for spiritual, royalty, and dignity.

From the advertiser’s point of view, we can conclude that colors can determine the shopping habits of customers. Black, blue, red and orange attract impulsive buyers. Smart shoppers are attracted to pink, light blue and navy blue colors. Companies use colors in logo, advertisement, etc., to pass the right message to the customer. Wal-Mart advertise has a navy blue background and its catch line is “We sell for less”, which means smart customers are their goal. Mercedes has a silver logo, true to its class.

Before designing an advertisement, the targeted customers should be recognized and the advertisers shouldn’t use the colors that are their personal favorites but according to the ad campaign. Advertisement for children should have bright and vibrant colors. Yellow, red, blue and green, which are the primary colors, are the colors, which attract the children, which is why parents buy those colors for their kids. These colors represent warmth, sweetness, trust, reliability, playfulness and security.

Impact Of Colors In Advertising

Building Desire in an Ads

The ‘desire’ portion of your ad is where you present the facts of your product; create and justify your prospect’s conviction, and cause him to demand ‘a piece of the action’ for himself. It’s vitally necessary that you present ‘proven facts’ about your product because survey results show that at least 80% of the people reading your ad – especially those reading it for the first time – will tend to question its authenticity. So, the more facts you can present in the ad, the more credible your offer.

As you write this part of your ad, always remember that the more facts about the product you present, the more product you’ll sell. People want facts as reasons, and/or excuses for buying a product – to justify to themselves and others, that they have not been ‘taken’ by a slick copywriter. It’s like the girl who wants to marry the guy her father calls a ‘no good bum.’ Her heart – her emotions – tell her yes, but she needs to nullify the seed of doubt lingering in her mind – to rationalize her decision to go on with the wedding.

In other words, the ‘desire’ portion of your ad has to build belief and credibility in the mind of your prospect. It has to assure him of his good judgment in the final decision to buy – furnish evidence of the benefits you have promised – and afford him a ‘safety net’ in case anyone should question his decision to buy.

People tend to believe the things that appeal to their individual desires, fears and other emotions. Once you have established a belief in this manner, logic and reasoning are used to support it.

People believe what they ‘want’ to believe. Your reader ‘wants’ to believe your ad if he has read it through this far – it is up to you to support his initial desire.